Tooth preservation treatments

Root Canal

Root canal treatment, also known as endodontic treatment, is the process of removing infected, injured or dead pulp from your tooth. The space inside the hard layers of each tooth is called the root canal system. This system is filled with soft dental pulp made up of nerves and blood vessels that help your tooth grow and develop.

Root canal therapy refers to the treatment of the inner aspects of a tooth, specifically that area inside a tooth originally occupied by the tooth's "pulp tissue". The process of root canal treatment first removes (as thoroughly as possible) bacteria, nerve tissue, the organic debris left over from the breakdown of nerve tissue, and bacterial toxins out from within the inner aspects of a tooth.

All of these items either are or will produce the tissue irritants that can cause your body to activate an inflammation reaction. Subsequently, once this space has been cleaned root canal treatment involves filling in and sealing off the interior of the tooth. This is done as a means of minimising the possibility that bacteria will be able to re-colonize the inner aspects of the tooth or that the interior of the tooth can fill in with tissue fluid that could become stagnant and subsequently break down. (Either of these situations could produce a state of persistent inflammation in the bone that surrounds the tooth's root.) The seal also contains and encapsulates any debris that could not be fully removed during the cleaning aspect of the root canal treatment process so that it cannot leak out and trigger an inflammation reaction.

After a root canal treatment, your tooth has to be restored (fixed) to look, feel and work as much like a natural tooth as possible. If an endodontist performed your root canal treatment, he or she will fill the opening of the tooth with a temporary filling and send you back to your dentist or prosthodontist for tooth restoration.

A prosthodontist is a dental specialist who restores and replaces teeth using crowns, bridges, dentures and implants. Your dentist or specialist may use a permanent filling or a crown to restore your tooth. The choice of restoration will depend on the strength of the part of the tooth that's left. A back tooth will likely need a crown because chewing puts a great deal of force on back teeth. If there is not enough of the tooth left, posts may be used to help support the crown.

Fillings

The most common cause of losing a tooth results from carries. These days, the majority of filling related work comprises tooth colour procedures. The most often used compounds are composite materials and glass ionomers. We can remove silver (amalgam) fillings and replace them with white, tooth coloured fillings.

Silver mercury fillings not only look unsightly but can actually be harmful to your teeth. They expand and contract in response to heat and cold weakening the tooth they were meant to protect. This can also induce the decay process to begin under the filling and commonly goes unnoticed until it is too late.

The compound material of the inlay can be plastic, ceramic, metal (especially Gold) based. It is prepared by the technician after the initial doctor's examination and report as advised. These days with the availability of new technologies and methods more people are able to choose to replace their silver mercury fillings with metal-free composite fillings or porcelain inlays and onlays.

Dental fillings are done in our dentistry after a consultation. The dentist will numb the area around the tooth to be worked on with a local anesthetic. Next, a drill, air abrasion instrument or laser will be used to remove the decayed area. The choice of instrument depends on the individual dentist's comfort level, training, and investment in the particular piece of equipment as well as location and extent of the decay.

Next step, our dentist will probe or test the area during the decay removal process to determine if all the decay has been removed. Once the decay has been removed, the dentist will prepare the space for the filling by cleaning the cavity of bacteria and debris. If the decay is near the root, the dentist may first put in a liner made of glass ionomer, composite resin, or other material to protect the nerve. Generally, after the filling is in, our dentist will finish and polish it.

Several additional steps are required for tooth-colored fillings and are as follows. After our dentist has removed the decay and cleaned the area, the tooth-colored material is applied in layers. after that a special light that "cures" or hardens each layer is applied. When the multilayering process is completed, the dentist will shape the composite material to the desired result, trim off any excess material and polish the final restoration. If your satisfied with the work our dentist had done to your tooth, the treatment is completed.